The Region: Aspen to Parachute

Aspen Community Foundation’s service area spans an 80-mile corridor of ranch land and mountain slopes along the Roaring Fork and Colorado rivers, comprising nearly 4,000 square miles. Our region is characterized as a “rural-resort” and encompasses three counties, four school districts, and 14 communities, serving an economically, politically, and ethnically diverse population.
  • DEmographics
  • Self Sufficiency standard
  • Free and reduced lunch (FRL)
Garfield
Total Population
58,984
Child Population (under 18)
15,378
White
69%
Hispanic/Latino
28%
Other Race/Ethnicity
3%
Language other than English
25%
Foreign Born
15%
Eagle
Total Population
53,928
Child Population (under 18)
12,701
White
67%
Hispanic/Latino
30%
Other Race/Ethnicity
3%
Language other than English
29%
Foreign Born
18%
Population
Colorado
5,400,000
USA
321,000,000
Pitkin
Total Population
17,773
Child Population (under 18)
3,033
White
86%
Hispanic/Latino
10%
Other Race/Ethnicity
4%
Language other than English
16%
Foreign Born
17%
Garfield
Self-Sufficiency Standard
$75,239
Median Household Income
$69,161
Unemployed
2.9%
Poverty Rate
11%
Children in Poverty
13%
Eagle
Self-Sufficiency Standard
$76,608
Median Household Income
$79,556
Unemployed
2.3%
Poverty Rate
8%
Children in Poverty
10%
Population
Colorado
5,400,000
USA
321,000,000
Pitkin
Self-Sufficiency Standard
$95,667
Median Household Income
$74,576
Unemployed
3.1%
Poverty Rate
9%
Children in Poverty
7%
Garfield
Free and Reduced Lunch (FRL)
46.7%
CCCAP Enrolled
154
Medicaid Enrolled
10,101
Uninsured
16%
Uninsured Children
14%
Eagle
Free and Reduced Lunch (FRL)
42.2%
CCCAP Enrolled
188
Medicaid Enrolled
5,523
Uninsured
13%
Uninsured Children
17%
Population
Colorado
5,400,000
USA
321,000,000
Pitkin
Free and Reduced Lunch (FRL)
4.2%
CCCAP Enrolled
20
Medicaid Enrolled
1,024
Uninsured
11%
Uninsured Children
17%
Why Do These Data Points Matter?
Population Data
Our regional population is diverse and our communities have nuanced strengths and needs.  It is important that we acknowledge these subtleties as we work with each community to strengthen the region.  Many people live in one community, work in another, and their children attend school in a third.  Therefore, ACF works with multiple partners to address needs through a regional lens. Data source: 2010 census

Self-Sufficiency Standard
The self-sufficiency standard is a more accurate measure of the threshold for needing government or community support to meet basic living needs.  Most federal programs use a percentage of the national poverty rate to determine eligibility.  In expensive areas, people need more income to make ends meet; therefore, the self-sufficiency rate for each county is calculated based on housing, healthcare, groceries, childcare, transportation to establish a more realistic baseline income needed to afford basic needs.  Often, in more expensive areas, people make too much to qualify for federal programs, but not enough to afford the basics. The self-sufficiency standards in the map are for a family of four: two adults, one infant, and one preschool child. The full range of standards for each county can be found below:  Data source: Colorado Center on Law and Policy
Garfield
Eagle
Pitkin

Free and Reduced Lunch

Free and Reduced Lunch (FRL) is used as an indicator of children who live in low-income or poverty households.  This is an important measure as these children tend to have additional stress, food and housing insecurity as an example, that interferes with their ability to maximize learning potential.  This does not mean they are not capable of learning; it means they have more barriers to learning than many of their middle income and wealthy peers. Data source: CDE

Language Other Than English
Speaking more than one language is an asset in life.  However, attending school and learning in a second language can be challenging and at times isolating.  We note this population in our demographics to help demonstrate the diverse needs that our schools and community partners are striving to meet.


The Aspen to Parachute region is home to working families, many of whom are employed in businesses and industries serving tourism in Aspen and the Roaring Fork Valley. There are substantial disparities in wealth in this region, which leads to dramatic differences in youth development and education outcomes for the region’s 24,000 children aged 0-24.

A profound educational achievement gap opens in kindergarten; and, too often, this gap is never closed. The preschools, afterschool enrichment programs, academic tutoring, college counseling, and summer camps that many affluent families take for granted are largely unavailable to low-income parents. Our region’s children are at risk.